Cannabis has been used for thousands of years for everything. Everyone knows that. But what about the research part of it?
CBD may help prevent cancer from spreading, researchers at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco reported in 2007.
 

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 Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder, in which sustained muscle contractions cause twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures.

DYSTONIA & cannabis studies completed

1981 - Study ~ Tetrahydrocannabinol potentiates reserpine-induced hypokinesia.

1984 - Study - Treatment of Meige's syndrome with cannabidiol

1985 - Study - Beneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient

1986 - Study - Cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders

1986 - Study ~ Open label evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.

1986 - Study ~ Cannabidiol (CBD) in dystonic movement disorders.

1994 - Study ~ (+)-WIN 55,212-2, a novel cannabinoid receptor agonist, exerts antidystonic effects in mutant dystonic hamsters.

1996 - Study - Evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders

1999 - Study ~ Cannabis in movement disorders.

2002 - Study ~ A Dramatic Response to Inhaled Cannabis in a Woman with Central Thalamic Pain and Dystonia

2003 - Study - Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents

2004 - Study ~ Cannabinoid agonists in the treatment of blepharospasm--a case report study.

2005 - Study - Cannabis sativa and dystonia secondary to Wilson's disease

2006 - Study - Current Status of Cannabis Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis with an Illustrative Case Presentation of a Patient with MS, Complex Vocal Tics, Paroxysmal Dystonia, and Marijuana Dependence Treated with Dronabinol

2010 - Letter ~ Tardive Dystonia and the Use of Cannabis

2011 - Study ~ Effects of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonism and antagonism on SKF81297-induced dyskinesia and haloperidol-induced dystonia in Cebus apella monkeys.

 

 

 

 
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What is Distonia?

Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents

TitleExperiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
Author(s)Lorenz R
Journal, Volume, IssueAbstract, IACM 2nd Conference on Cannabinoids in Medicine, September 12-13, 2003, Cologne
Major outcome(s)Positive effects of THC in children with severe neurological disorders
 
IndicationSpasticity;Dystonia;Epilepsy;AnxietyAbstract
MedicationDelta-9-THC

8 patients – children or adolescents aged 3 to 14 years – have been treated with Ä9-THC, dosages ranged from 0.04 mg/kg body weight to 0.14 mg/kg body weight.
In an 8 year-old-boy with NCL Jansky-Bielschowsky spasticity was diminished, he became more alert and his mood improved.
In a 12 year-old-girl, who had suffered from severe hypoxia during birth, mood improved, awareness was increased and focal seizures (presenting as nystagmus and versive movement) but not tonic-clonic seizures were reduced.
A 12 year-old-girl with PDHC-deficiency became more interested in her surroundings and society. Nodding spasms and tonic seizures decreased.
In a 14 year-old-girl with marked dystonia due to NCL Spielmeyer-Vogt a reduction of abnormal movement patterns was observed. In addition the girl had more initiative.
In a 13 year-old-boy presenting with spasticity, athetosis, myoclonic movements and epileptic seizures of unknown cause interest in his surroundings was improved, myoclonic movements were less intense but of similar frequency. Frequency and duration of his focal and generalized seizures were not influenced.
In an 11 year-old-girl with a traumatic paraplegia a significant improvement of symptoms of a posttraumatic reaction presenting as an eating disorder and negative behaviour was observed. Taking higher doses the girl started to develop side effects including inappropriate language (concerning sexual content) and very associative thinking. Therapy was discontinued without signs of withdrawal.
In a 3 10/12 year-old-boy with a traumatic paraplegia a significant improvement in his behaviour and eating disorder was observed.
In a 14 year-old-boy suffering from intractable epilepsy and severe mental retardation appetite and mood improved. Frequency of seizures seemed not to be influenced, but clear assessment was not possible because antiepileptic drugs were changed.
Conclusion: In severly disabled children and adolescents Ä9-THC-medication can have positive psychotropic effects, influences the degree of spasticity and dystonia and-occasionally-seems to have an anticonvulsant action.

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Route(s)Oral
Dose(s)0.04 - 0.14 mg/kg body weight
Duration (days) 
Participants8 children with different neurological disorders
DesignUncontrolled case report
Type of publicationMeeting abstract
Address of author(s)Paediatrician, Brunnenstrasse 54, 34537 Bad Wildungen, Germany
Full text 

Evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders

TitleOpen label evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
Author(s)Consroe P, Sandyk R, Snider SR
Journal, Volume, IssueInternational Journal of Neuroscience 1986;30(4):277-282
Major outcome(s)20-50% improvement of dystonia; deterioration of tremor and hypokinesia in 2 patients with Parkinson's disease
 
IndicationDystonia; Parkinson's diseaseAbstract
MedicationCannabidiol

Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid of Cannabis, was given to 5 patients with dystonic movement disorders in a preliminary open pilot study. Oral doses of CBD rising from 100 to 600 mg/day over a 6 week period were administered along with standard medication. Dose-related improvement in dystonia was observed in all patients and ranged from 20 to 50%. Side-effects of CBD were mild and included hypotension, dry mouth, psychomotor slowing, lightheadedness, and sedation. In 2 patients with coexisting Parkinsonian features, CBD at doses over 300 mg/day exacerbated the hypokinesia and resting tremor. CBD appears to have antidystonic and Parkinsonism-aggravating effects in humans.

 

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Route(s)Oral
Dose(s)100-600 mg per day
Duration (days)42
Participants5 patients with dystonia
DesignOpen study
Type of publication 
Address of author(s)Department of Pharmacology/Toxicology, University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, USA
Full text

Cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders

TitleCannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
Author(s)Sandyk R, Snider SR, Consroe P, Elias SM.
Journal, Volume, IssuePsychiatry Res. 1986 Jul;18(3):291.
Major outcome(s)Cannabidiol (CBD) reduced dystonic movements
 
IndicationDystoniaAbstract
MedicationCannabidiol

(Fulltext)

Letter to the editors:
Evidence has recently accumulated to suggest that cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid of marijuana, may be useful in the management of hyperkinetic movement disorders (Snider and Consroe, 1984, 1985). We have therefore tested the efficacy of CBD in two patients with dystonic movement disorders.
A 65-year-old woman had idiopathic spasmodic torticollis of 2 years’ duration. Her condition was characterized by a lateral pulling of her neck to the right, which occurred at a frequency of 8-12/minute. In addition, she had essential-type tremor affecting both hands, which was only partially relieved with atenolol (50mg/day). CBD (200mg, orally) produced an amelioration of the dystonic movements within 3 hours of the lateral neck movements to 2-4/minute. The patient’s improvement was confirmed by an evaluation of two independent neurologists.
A 31-year-old man had generalized torsion dystonia (dystonia musculorum deformans) of 20 years’ duration. He had obtained mild benefit from high doses (25-45 mg/day) of trihexyphenidyl, but was confirmed to a wheelchair. CBD (200 mg, orally) produced an amelioration of his symptoms (especially of his more severely affected right leg) within two hours of administration. Following CBD administration, he was able to walk without support, an effect that lasted about 24 hours. In both cases, CBD produced no adverse effects.
Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to have significant muscle relaxant effects and to reduce muscular spasms in humans (Petro, 1980). In rodents, CBD has been reported to reduce cholinergic transmission (Revuelta et al., 1978) and to increase turnover of gamma-aminobutyric acid (Revuelta et al., 1979). Acute administration of delta-tetradydrocannabinol to rats greatly potentiated the hypokinetic effect of reserpine (Moss et al., 1984), suggesting that this compound may have antidyskinetic properties in humans and that further studies of CBD in other hyperkinetic movement disorders in humans and warranted.

 

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Route(s)Oral
Dose(s)200 mg
Duration (days) 
Participants2 case reports
DesignUncontrolled case report
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s) 
Full text

Beneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient

TitleBeneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient with sinemet-induced dystonic dyskinesia.
Author(s)Snider SR, Consroe P.
Journal, Volume, IssueNeurology 1985;35(Suppl):201.
Major outcome(s)Improvement of dyskinesia
 
IndicationParkinson's diseaseAbstract
MedicationCannabidiol

(Fulltext)
In idiopathic dystonia, the terapeutic effect of marijuana smoking is reported to be comparable to diazepam (C.D. Marsden, in Disorders of Movement, 1981,81). The non-psychoactive cannabis derivative, cannabidiol (CBD), also improves dystonia (Consroe and Snider, in Cannbinoids as Therapeutic Agents, in press). We report the effect of CBD on dystonia secondary to Sinemet in parkinsonism, a disorder thought to be a relative contraindication for cannabinoids (D.Moss et al, Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1981, 1984). The patient, a 42-year- old man with an 8-year history of parkinsonism, developed peak-dose dyskinesia about 4 years ago and action dystonia affecting all limbs more recently. Trihexyphenidyl and bromocriptine each produced only slight improvement. To stable optimal dosages of the three drugs, CBD was added, starting with 100 mg/d and increasing by 100 mg weekly. At 100 to 200 mg/d, there was a decrease in clinical fluctuations and in dyskinesia scores (by 30%) without a significant worsening of the parkinsonism. At 300 to 400 mg/d, there was no further improvement in the dyskinesia, and adverse effects (dizziness, drowsiness, increased Parkinson symptoms) appeared. CBD withdrawal resulted in 3 days of severe generalized dystonia and several weeks of increased sensitivity to Sinemet, suggestive of a “drug holiday” effect.

 

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Route(s)Oral
Dose(s)100-400 mg
Duration (days) 
Participants1 patient with parkinsonism and secondary dystonia.
DesignUncontrolled case report
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s) 
Full text

Treatment of Meige's syndrome with cannabidiol

TitleTreatment of Meige's syndrome with cannabidiol.
Author(s)Snider S.R, Consroe P.
Journal, Volume, IssueNeurology 1984;34(Suppl):147.
Major outcome(s)50% improvement in spasm severity and frequency
 
IndicationDystoniaAbstract
MedicationCannabidiol

Cannabidiol (CBD) is the major nonpsychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana. The anticonvulsant properties of CBD were demonstrated in humans 5 years ago. Based on anecdotal reports of improvement of generalized dystonia with marijuana smoking, we decided to try CBD in a patient with severe cranial dystonia (Meige syndrome). The patient, a 42-year-old man, first developed mild blepharospasm 9 years ago. The abnormal movements gradually spread to the oromandibular and neck muscles and worsened to the point that the patient was unable to drive. Many drugs were tried, with disappointing results. CBD was initiated at 100 mg/day, in divided doses, and slowly increased over several weeks to 400 mg/day. Other drugs were kept the same. Spasm frequency, counted twice daily by a relative while the patient was either talking or driving, gradually decreased from 20 to 30 per min before CBD to 7 or 15 per min at a dosage of 400 mg/day. Examinations at weekly intervals using a standard rating scale confirmed at least 50 % improvement in spasm severity and frequency. Withdrawal of CBD for 24 hours resulted in reappearance of severe spasm at 25 to 30 per min. Side effects included dry mouth, transient morning headache, and slight sedation.

 

 

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Route(s)Oral
Dose(s) 
Duration (days) 
ParticipantsA 42 year old Meige syndrome patient
DesignUncontrolled case report
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s) 
Full text

Current Status of Cannabis Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis with an Illustrative Case Presentation of a Patient with MS, Complex Vocal Tics, Paroxysmal Dystonia, and Marijuana Dependence Treated with Dronabinol

Deutsch SI, Rosse RB, Connor JM, Burket JA, Murphy ME, Fox FJ

 CNS Spectr 2008 May; 13(5):393-403.

Pain, spasticity, tremor, spasms, poor sleep quality, and bladder and bowel dysfunction, among other symptoms, contribute significantly to the disability and impaired quality of life of many patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Motor symptoms referable to the basal ganglia, especially paroxysmal dystonia, occur rarely and contribute to the experience of distress. A substantial percentage of patients with MS report subjective benefit from what is often illicit abuse of extracts of the Cannabis sativa plant; the main cannabinoids include delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and cannabidiol. Clinical trials of cannabis plant extracts and synthetic delta9-THC provide support for therapeutic benefit on at least some patient self-report measures. An illustrative case is presented of a 52-year-old woman with MS, paroxysmal dystonia, complex vocal tics, and marijuana dependence. The patient was started on an empirical trial of dronabinol, an encapsulated form of synthetic delta9-THC that is usually prescribed as an adjunctive medication for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. The patient reported a dramatic reduction of craving and illicit use; she did not experience the "high" on the prescribed medication. She also reported an improvement in the quality of her sleep with diminished awakenings during the night, decreased vocalizations, and the tension associated with their emission, decreased anxiety and a decreased frequency of paroxysmal dystonia.

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Cannabis sativa and dystonia secondary to Wilson's disease

Mov Disord.  2005; 20(1):113-5 (ISSN: 0885-3185)

Uribe Roca MC; Micheli F; Viotti R
Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Service, José de San Martín Clinicas Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

A patient with generalized dystonia due to Wilson's disease obtained marked improvement in response to smoking cannabis.

Major Subject Heading(s)Minor Subject Heading(s)CAS Registry / EC Numbers

 

 

 


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